The House of Life, the Per Ankh

 per ankh

Welcomeinpeace

Note: This is created for Panhistoria roleplay.

 What is a Per Ankh?

 Illiterate? Don't worry, most Egyptians are. Learn how to read hieroglyphs.
 Got the sounds down? Now learn specific words. (And find out what the above hieroglyphs mean!)

 Learn hieratic at Stephen Fryer's Basic Lessons in Hieratic. More scribes know hieratic than hieroglyphs.
 Expecting a new character? Read about female names.
 And male names.

 Per Medjat - The scrolls by major type of text.

 House of Life, Per Ankh

 

Welcome to our per ankh. People say we have had per ankhs since Old Kingdom times. While our ancestors had some in the Middle Kingdom, most have been founded in the 19th dynasty, and the number of per ankhs is expected to increase. We collect and maintain texts on many topics, including medicine, astronomy, and math, and priests and scribes can study various fields like art, theology, rituals, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine here. Our scribes are important scholars in their own right, and they are willing to help you as they do their own research. Our scribes can read or recite much of what has been archived here. Some even think we write out the Book of the Dead for important individuals, or teach children of the royal court. Seers say that a future institution called the Library of Alexandria will be modeled after our idea of a per ankh.

If you are from other parts of Egypt and are hoping to find a per ankh near you, try the biggest city near you. There are per ankhs in Memphis, Akhmim, Abydos, here in Koptos, Esna, and Edfu, and there was said to be one at Akhetaten. No doubt there is one at Thebes as well. Some are independant, but some are closely associated with temples.

Sources:

Andrews, Mark. (1999-2005). "Part V: Associated Element." Ancient Egyptian Temple Elements. InterCity Oz. http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/templeother.htm

Bunson, Margaret. (1991). "House of Life, libraries." A Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sources:

Brier, Bob, and Hoyt Hobbs. (1999). Daily Life of the Ancient Egyptians. Westport, Connecticutt: Greenwood Press.

Bunson, Margaret. (1991). "House of Life, Literature." A Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. New York: Oxford University Press.

Shaw, Ian, and Paul Nicholson. (1995, 2003). "wisdom literature." The Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. New York: Harry N Abrams, Inc.

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